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Courses

  • Energy is a vital part of our daily lives. This course examines where that energy comes from, and the advantages and disadvantages across different fuels. Contextual analysis of energy decisions for transportation and electricity generation around the world. Energy resources covered include oil, biomass, natural gas, nuclear, hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and emerging technologies....

  • Concepts, methods, and applications. Energy/environmental policy issues such as automobile fuel economy regulation, global climate change, research and development policy, and environmental benefit assessment. Group project. Prerequisite: MS&E 241 or ECON 50, 51.

  • This project based class focuses on the design and prototyping of electric vehicles. Students learn the fundamentals of vehicle design in class and apply the knowledge as they form teams and work on projects involving concept, specifications, structure, systems, integration, assembly, testing, etc. The class meets once a week to learn about the fundamentals, exchange their experiences, and...

  • Transportation accounts for nearly one-third of American energy use and greenhouse gas emissions and three-quarters of American oil consumption. It has crucial impacts on climate change, air pollution, resource depletion, and national security. Students wishing to address these issues reconsider how we move, finding sustainable transportation solutions. An introduction to the issue, covering...

  • (Formerly 223B) An introduction to the concepts and applications in computer vision. Topics include: cameras and projection models, low-level image processing methods such as filtering and edge detection; mid-level vision topics such as segmentation and clustering; shape reconstruction from stereo, as well as high-level vision tasks such as object recognition, scene recognition, face detection...

  • (Formerly COMM 165N.) Preference to freshmen. Focus is on the past, present and future of the automobile, bridging the humanities, social sciences, design, and engineering. Focus on the human experiences of designing, making, driving, being driven, living with, and dreaming of the automobile. A different theme featured each week in discussion around a talk and supported by key readings and...

  • Preference to sophomores. The influence of human anatomy on the design of commercial products and competitive activities (such as: automobile and furniture design, sports clothing and shoe design, robotics, and dance and choreography). How societal advancements have evolved to increasingly accommodate human form and function. Guest speakers in the fields of design, architecture, and sports....

  • Capstone course. Thermal analysis and engineering emphasizing integrating heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics into a unified approach to treating complex systems. Mixtures, humidity, chemical and phase equilibrium, and availability. Labs apply principles through hands-on experience with a turbojet engine, PEM fuel cell, and hybrid solid/oxygen rocket motor. Use of MATLAB as a...

  • Human needs that lead to the conceptualization of future products, environments, systems, and services. Field work in public and private settings; appraisal of personal values; readings on social ethnographic issues; and needfinding for a corporate client. Emphasis is on developing the flexible thinking skills that enable the designer to navigate the future. Prerequisites for undergraduates:...

  • ME216C: Implementation II is a continuation of ME216B. Students would develop project from ME216B to a further state of completion. Design will be completed, details about manufacturing, cost and production will be developed. Students will validate their projects by making them real in the world. Prerequisites for class are ME216A and ME216B.Prerequisite: 216A and 216B.

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